Macclesfield Unitarians


Death

“If only the funeral service itself could feel genuine and really personal”
It can – if it’s Unitarian
Unitarians believe that it is the individuality of people that makes them human;
that everyone is free to choose what they believe
– or don’t believe –
in this life;
and we believe that a funeral should reflect the true nature of a person -
without imposing inappropriate words or beliefs on their memory . . . or on to you.
Together we can create a funeral that feels only right and natural

My husband died suddenly aged 41, leaving our two sons and me bewildered, shocked and raw with overwhelming grief. I knew that I had to “get on” but I just could not face an impersonal, formal funeral in the parish church. I didn’t even want to think about it.
I was a member of the chapel community, and it was with great relief that I remembered D saying that although he wasn’t a “churchy person” he felt at home in the chapel.
I called Michael, he recommended a funeral director, and from then on the process of planning D’s ceremony became a loving, creative, personal tribute and not a chore.
My memories of the process are a little blurred, but I remember the chapel community coming together to help with the service and support us. Michael showed skill and sensitivity in blending the wishes of all the close family into a service we could all feel part of. The children were able to contribute in their unique way. It was refreshing to be able to laugh and cry , and express our ideas freely.
The ceremony we created included rock music, classical music, tributes, one son playing a piano piece he had composed with his dad, and the other describing what had happened in his own words.
It was a positive experience in the midst of a tragic situation, and so many people commented that they too felt they could be themselves in our chapel.
For me, it didn’t end there, because I am still supported by, and feel part of the community. And I still laugh and cry freely